#11 Days To FASDay – Tie Some Knots

Let’s Knot to be Silent
INSTRUCTIONS TO TIE YOUR OWN FASKnots

By Bonnie Buxton,
author Damaged Angels
co-founder International FASDay
Re-printed from December ICEBERG 2008

In January of 1999, while digging out from a Toronto snowstorm, my husband Brian Philcox and I realized that September 9, 1999 (9-9-99), would present an opportunity to inform the world that during the nine months of pregnancy, alcohol is dangerous to the baby.

Within 24 hours, Teresa Kellerman of Tucson, Arizona, had contributed her creativity and Internet genius by encouraging volunteers in seven countries and 11 time zones to participate in the first International FAS Awareness Day.

Because every ribbon colour had been taken by other causes, Brian and I spent several hours developing the FASKnot symbol in honor of the first book about Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, Michael Dorris’s “The Broken Cord.”

Ten years later, the events continue and now we challenge FASD advocates to take advantage of 2009 to build awareness all year long, particularly on 09-09-09. This year in Canada, FASDay events included a major conference, some candlelight vigils, “mocktail” competitions, breakfasts, luncheons, a play, and one brave woman with ARND speaking out for the first time to a group of university students. Many of these events brought media attention to FASD, building awareness in the community.

Join the movement to Build Better Baby Brains Let’s Raise the Standard

Jodee

#27 Days To FASDay – Host a baby shower

Plan a PARTY!

A PREGNANT PAUSE EVENT or HOST A BABY SHOWER FOR A NEW SOON-TO-BE MOM

Get a group of friends and join together to
support sobriety for a newly pregnant mom.

Need some ideas….

Visit Liz Kulp’s
FunWithoutAlcohol blog for FREE RECIPES

Download some great SPIRIT FREE RECIPES

Host a Non-Alcoholic Drink Mixing Contest with the best drink toasted to the future.

Take a PASS commitment to support a sober pregnancy – offering to find spirit free fun events and support during the tough and joyous moments.

Most of all HAVE FUN and CELEBRATE

Join the
Million Minds March to Build Better Baby Brains
Raise the Standard
Zero 4 Nine

Amazon.com Widgets

#28 Days To FASDay – An easy FASDay Plan

AN EASY FASDay Plan
Yes! You and one friend can do something!

Easy Plan – The Foolproof FAS Day Formula
Sit down with paper and pen. If you have one or two other key people to work with, print up copies of this manual, and invite them to join you. Give them some time to read it, and then answer the following questions:

  • Who is chairing this event?
  • Who can we count on to help out?
  • What kind of help can they give us?
  • Who do we know will want to attend?
  • Potential attendees — what other people and organizations in the community do we want to reach? (Start with interested friends and family members, and professionals –doctors, lawyers, teachers, etc. – that you know. Then add people who should be interested: e.g., local municipal, state/provincial and federal politicians, agencies with an interest in FAS, school personnel, etc.)
  • How many people can we reasonably expect to attend?
  • Will we require child care?
  • Where should we hold this event?
  • Who are our best local media contacts to promote this event and the FAS issue?

1. Confirm location.
Once you’ve decided how many people are likely to attend, choose your location. Try to find a reasonably-sized meeting room with comfortable seating, and a convenient area to serve coffee, tea, juice, and snacks.
2. How to Obtain a FAS Day Proclamation
If you want civic and state FAS Day proclamations, find out the appropriate name to write to, and do this immediately. You’ll find a boiler-plate letter plus sample proclamations in this document. (Note: Canada’s provincial governments are not likely to issue proclamations.)
3. Planning the Video Premiere — Plus
The program is a simple one, but you’re going to need to make some choices.
Who will be M.C.? Choose the most articulate person in your group, or try for a local personality who could be sympathetic to your cause – e.g., a TV or radio broadcaster or local entertainment figure.

  • Will you use the Invocation, and if so, who will read it?
  • Will you ask your mayor or a municipal counsellor to read the Proclamation?
  • How will you observe the worldwide “Minute of Reflection” at 9:09 a.m.? e.g., will someone ring a bell nine times?
  • Or will you say a prayer, sing a song, have someone play a musical instrument, or have simple silence?
  • Will you have a keynote speaker following the video, and if so, who?
  • Or will you have a panel discussion? Your panel could include a birth parent, a foster or adoptive parent, an articulate survivor of FAS/FAE and a professional (teacher, doctor or nurse, psychologist or social worker, knowledgeable lawyer or judge, etc.)
  • Will you add music to the mix – possibly a live musician?
  • Would you like to close with the poem, “The Integrity of Hope,” by Michael Kami? And if so, who will read it?

4. Invitations and flyersWe’ve enclosed a sample invitation and 2 sample flyer/posters. Ask your committee members to come up with names of people to invite, and make a master list, which can be used in 2001. To save on postage, you may want to e-mail and fax many of your invitations, but make sure to follow up with a personal phone call. The invitation contains a RSVP: whose number will invitees call?
5. Breakfast Food and Drink
Easy does it. Muffins and/or bagels, cheese or cream cheese optional, possibly some cut-up melon or citrus fruit, coffee, tea and fruit juice, cream/milk and sugar. Possibly a local retailer or coffee shop may be willing to make a donation. If you’re tight for cash, possibly a local service club or church will help. Will you need storage or refrigeration or help setting up tables? Do you have enough electric coffeemakers?
6. Other equipment
Make sure your video equipment is adequate well in advance of Sept. 9.

  • Is your VCR working?
  • Is your TV set or monitor large enough for the size of group you expect?
  • If you’re expecting two dozen people or more, you may need two or more monitors hooked up to one VCR: this can be done easily with a splitter. Most audio-visual specialty stores can show you how it’s done.
  • If more people than you expect turn up, simply hold two screening sessions. One group snacks and chats while the other group watches the video. Then they trade places.
    Your alternative is to rent a video projector and screen from a company specializing in video display or presentation rentals. This will cost about $250-$300 per day, and you will need to darken the room. Some colleges and universities have this equipment in screening rooms.

7. Media RelationsYou’ll find a sample media release, ready for you to personalize with local information. Make a list of all of the members of the media you would like to reach, particularly those whom you know personally. You should also prepare a list of individuals who are knowledgeable about FAS, and willing to talk to the media. These might include participants on your panel – parents, people with FAS, and professionals. The media release can be faxed, but make sure you have a person who will make follow-up phone calls. You will also need a media contact for any members of the press, radio or TV who want to know more.
8. OtherBells and carillons around the world will be ringing nine times at 9:09 a.m. in the international Bell Concordance, to remind the world that during the nine months of pregnancy, a woman should not consume alcohol. If there is a church bell in your community, you may want to speak to the minister or priest, to ask if it is rung manually. If so, we suggest you photocopy the material from the FASworld Report regarding the Bell Concordance, or download and print it from the website http://www.come-over.to/FASDAY/manual.htm , and invite the church to join in. If you live in a city which is lucky enough to have a carillon, get the name of the carillonneur and do the same. Gerald Martindale, carillonneur at Toronto’s Metropolitan United Church geraldm@planeteer.com> is building on last year’s concert of international lullabies and would be pleased to share this with other international carillonneurs.

  • Make sure you have a guest book easily accessible as guests enter or leave. It would be useful to have someone stationed to remind people to sign the guest book and hand out FAS Knots as your guests arrive.
  • The FAS awareness symbol, the FAS Knot can be easily made for about 8 cents each. They can be given away, sold for about $2-3 each, or you can simply have a cash box available for donations. Complete information on the FAS Knot can be found at www.come-over.to/FASDAY/manual.htm
    FAS Knots and the guest book can be placed on an information table, with other available material. The table can also include petitions your group wishes to support.

For suggestions for both U.S. and Canadian petitions, e-mail Bonnie Buxton at ogrady@axxent.ca.
For suggestions on posters and printed material you can download yourself, check out the website
http://come-over.to/FASdisk/

#29 Days To FASDay – How to make a FAS Knot

TIE SOME FASKnotsand Pass Them Around Town or School

The FAS Knot – A Symbol for Our Time
We have been pleased by the enthusiasm that volunteers from New Zealand to Arctic Alaska and Canada’s northern territories of Yukon and Nunavut to South Africa have expressed for our unique, wearable symbol, the “FAS Knot.” Each FAS Knot can be easily made in about a minute, for less than ten cents, and can be used as a fund-raiser ($2-$5 each) or given away as reminders of the work we all do to help prevent FASD.
This piece of knotted cord was designed in memory of Abel Dorris, 1968-1991, whose brief and poignant life resulted in the groundbreaking 1989 book about Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, “The Broken Cord,” written by his father, Michael Dorris, 1945-1997.
The broken cord may refer to the umbilical cord, the spinal cord, the nervous system, the cord between the generations, or the cable on an elevator. Michael Dorris wrote that if we back off on our children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effects (i.e. Alcohol-Related Neurodevelopmental Disorder), they will sink and crash like an elevator once the cable is snapped.
Years later, a loving community around the world reconnected the broken cord, and the FAS Knot is our symbol. The cord is tied in a square knot, sometimes called a reef knot, the favored knot for reconnecting a broken line or cord. The knot is stronger than the cord itself, and cannot be broken or snapped.
To make the FAS Knot, we suggest an eight-inch piece of 3/16″ white cord, available in most hardware stores for a few cents per foot. You make a circle approximately the size of your thumb, then tie right over left and under; left over right and under. It should look like two loops intertwined. (Volunteers in Germany and New Zealand use a thinner cord, and make a more discreet knot. The choice is up to you.)
By choosing a cord instead of a ribbon, we are separating ourselves from all of the other campaigns. We are not just another cause trying to raise money – we represent those millions of individuals and their families who have gone unrecognized, unidentified, neglected on this continent and throughout the world.
The circle symbolizes the womb, a baby’s head, the human brain, the earth. And we, a planet-size network of people who care about people living with FASD, are the knot that will make them whole. If women did not drink in pregnancy, FASD would be totally eliminated.
Our long-range goal is to rename this small piece of cord, “The FAS Not!”
The FAS Knot lapel pin is a more recent innovation and can also be used for fund raising. Many groups resell the pin for $5 or $6.
The pin is available for the low cost of C$3/pin for orders of 25 or more. Shipping is free for orders of 100 or more. The pin is white enamel with a faux gold edge and is approximately 1.8 cm wide. The FAS Knot lapel pin is a registered trademark of FASworld Canada. The lapel pin may not be replicated, copied or incorporated into any other design without specific written permission from FASworld Canada.
The original FAS Knot was designed by Bonnie Buxton and Brian Philcox, and is an official symbol of FASworld. You can find step-by-step photos above. We encourage groups supporting FASD endeavours to use it for promotion or fund-raising, and ask only that you notify us before doing so.

E-mail us at info@fasworld.comHow to Make a FAS Knot

THE FAS KNOT STORY

“A threefold cord is not quickly broken.”
–The Bible, Ecclesiastes IV, 10

In 1999, volunteers from New Zealand and South Africa to Nunavut used the FAS Knot as a symbol of our worldwide campaign to inform the world about Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and related disorders.
This piece of knotted cord was designed in memory of Abel Dorris, 1968-1991, whose brief and poignant life resulted in the groundbreaking 1989 book about Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, The Broken Cord, written by his father, Michael Dorris, 1945-1997.
The broken cord may refer to the umbilical cord, the spinal cord, the nervous system, the cord between the generations, or the cable on an elevator. Michael Dorris wrote that if we back off on our children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effects, they will sink like an elevator once the cable is snapped. Ten years after Dorris’s book, a loving community around the world reconnected the broken cord, developing the FAS Knot as our symbol.
Each knot can be made easily and cheaply in less than a minute. The cord is tied in a square knot, sometimes called a reef knot, the favoured knot for reconnecting a broken line or cord. The knot is stronger than the cord itself, and cannot be broken or snapped. You may want to sell the knots for $2-$5, or ask for donations.
Volunteers in the U.S. and Canada generally use an eight-inch piece of 3/16″ white cord, available in most hardware stores for a few cents per foot. Volunteers in New Zealand and Germany have made smaller, more discreet FAS Knots, using thinner cord. Make a circle approximately the size of your thumb (possibly smaller if you use a thinner cord), then tie right over left and under; left over right and under. Using a straight pin or safety pin, pin this to your lapel or other garment with the loop above and the knot below.
Step-by-step photos of the FAS Knot may be seen on the website at www.come-over.to/FASDAY/manual.htm
We have chosen a cord instead of a ribbon, to separate ourselves from all of the other campaigns. We are not just another cause trying to raise money — we represent those millions of individuals and their families who have gone unrecognized, unidentified, neglected on this continent and throughout the world.
The circle symbolizes the womb, a baby’s head, the human brain, the earth. And we, a planet-size network of people who care about people living with FAS, are the knot that will make them whole. FAS is totally preventable. We must create a society in which everyone recognizes that there is no lower threshold for drinking in pregnancy. Our long-range goal is to rename this small piece of cord, “The FAS Not!”
The FAS Knot was designed by Bonnie Buxton and Brian Philcox, trademark pending.

Copy for FAS Knot Scroll (optional)
(You may want to print a one-page sheet, roll it up in a scroll, and tuck each one inside the loop of a FAS Knot. The sheet can contain information about the program, and also includes this information about the Knot.)

THE FAS KNOT
This piece of knotted cord was designed in memory of Abel Dorris, 1968-1991, whose brief and poignant life resulted in the groundbreaking 1989 book about Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, “The Broken Cord,” written by his father, Michael Dorris, 1945-1997.
The broken cord may refer to the umbilical cord, the spinal cord, the nervous system, the cord between the generations, or the cable on an elevator. Michael Dorris wrote that if we back off on our children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effects, they will sink like an elevator once the cable is snapped.
The circle symbolizes the womb, a baby’s head, the human brain, the earth. And we, a planet-size network of people who care about people living with FAS, are the knot that will make them whole. FAS is totally preventable. We must create a society in which everyone recognizes that there is no lower threshold for drinking in pregnancy. Our long-range goal is to rename this small piece of cord, “The FAS Not!”

#35 Days To FASDay – Invocation


FASDay Invocation & Poem

(This beautiful and inclusive prayer was written and delivered by Sister Eileen Power at the Toronto observance, and has been updated. It’s freely available for anyone in the world who wants to use it. If you use it, please credit Sister Eileen Power, and mention that she is a teaching sister of the Congregation of Notre Dame in Toronto.)

by Sr. Eileen Power, CND

O Great Spirit, Creator of the Universe, we gather on the ninth minute of the ninth hour of the ninth day of the ninth month in the (first year of the New Millennium).
Our connection with our whole world is made visible in a special way today.
People in every time zone gather, as we gather, to change our world.
By our coming together and our working together, we will make the world better.
Accept our prayers with all who are praising you this very moment and with all who will gather today.
As we begin (this millennium), we are filled with hope,
O Ever-Creating God,
that in the circle of life,
in the cosmos, in the womb,
in our hearts,
your hope goes round,
your strength goes round,
your power goes round,
your love goes round and
our hearts and spirits are joined in a new birth.

We gather to intensify our awareness of the fragile beauty of life from the first moment of conception, of the privilege of the nine months of pregnancy, and of our resolve to help all children and adults with fetal substance disorders to lead happier and more fulfilling lives.

All of our words, gestures and hopes of today:
Our silence and our bells,
Our dance and our reflection,
Our words and our drums,
Our children and our knots,
Our lullabies and our resolve,
All of our words, gestures and hopes of today,
Are powerful reminders that life is your gift to us.
May the drumming of our hearts, echoing the drum of the heartbeat of the universe, be the sound of your tender love.
May the knot of our connections be ever firm. And may this special moment on this special day continue to mark the beginning of change, for mothers, for fathers, for all children and for those yet-to-be, and for all of us who join in spirit today around this unique planet, so beautiful, so fragile, so large and yet so small. Together, we are family.

“The Integrity of Hope” (optional)
This is a warm and positive way to end your event, particularly if it is read by a birth mother or person living with FASDs.

The Integrity of Hope
by Michael Kami, 1993

Just as the gentle flutter of a butterfly’s wing
Can change the path of a hurricane
So the gentle beat of a child’s heart
Can change the destiny of the world.
Children are our future and our hope.
Only they determine humanity’s progress.
We must protect all children.
We must feed all children.
We must educate all children.
We must love all children.
They are we and we are they,
In a joint journey to a better future!

#41 Days To FASDay – Gear Up – Recap Ideas


Make a social difference that will impact millions –
help support friends and family members who are pregnant to help
“Build Better Baby Brains” for the future.

September 9

Read Book One before
Book Two – Tiger Butterfly is
released in September 2012


Need gear for your event: 

7 FREE Themes to Build Your Event! 

Simply pick a theme and go – you can get shirts, mugs, stickers, buttons and if you don’t see it let me know and I can make it available.

  1. Each One Reach One Campaign
  2. Be a Life Saver Million Mind March
  3. Raise the Standard – Building Better Baby Brains
  4. Think. before you drink. 
  5. Free Spirit
  6. Trail Markers
  7. Life Braids

Step up to raise the standard. FASD is 100% preventable and lasts a lifetime.
Consider reading “The Whitest Wall” to learn more about the realities of FASD. Book Two – Tiger Butterfly to be released September 9 – share with your friends. Winner Mom’s Choice Gold Best Adult Fiction and Best Young Adult Fiction. High School Curriculum and Discussion available.

To learn more visit:
Million Mind March 09.09 Website

Follow SILENT VOICES
#60 Days of Ideas to Countdown to FASDay Celebrations

Let me know if you choose to do something and we will post it to our international site at http://www.fasday.com/

#43 Days To FASDay – Write some letters


Write a Letter to the President or Your Country’s Leader! Write to your mayor or the university president in your community

Write a Letter to the President
or Your Country’s Leader!

This is a great summer family fun project…
Everyone can “make some noise” –
artwork, postcards and note cards are great from kids

Dear President Obama,
Let me tell you about fetal alcohol spectrum disorders or FASD,
…..go kids you can do it!!!

As part of International FASD Awareness Day,
please join us in this easy, free activity
to help raise awareness of FASD at the highest
levels of our government.

This idea originated with Tami Eller, a member of our local FASD Council.
Cheri Scott, FASD Family Support Project – Stone Soup
http://www.stonesoupgroup.org/

A knowledge of the path cannot be substituted for putting one foot in front of the other.
M.C. Richards

Dear President Obama…

Let me tell you about FASD…

International FASD Awareness Day Letter Writing Campaign.

Did you know that President Obama reads 10 letters each night written by everyday Americans? Imagine if every letter the President read was written by someone whose life is impacted by Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

If everyone affected by FASD writes to the President prior to September 9th then the probability of him opening even one letter regarding FASD is incredible. The more letters, the higher the probability that all ten letters he reads will be written by those affected by FASD.

  • Are you a parent of a child with FASD?
  • Are you an adult with FASD?
  • Doesyour sibling have FASD?
  • Do you teach a child or an adult with FASD?
  • Are you a grandparent of a child with FASD?

For everyone person born affected by prenatal exposure to alcohol, everyone who loves that individual lives are also affected.

Join us in educating President Obama regarding the most prevalent of all birth defects: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

Join us in asking President Obama to ring a bell at 9:09 am on September 9 to recognize the importance of Nine Months of an Alcohol Free Pregnancy.

Starting the week of September 1 send a letter to President Obama telling him your story of how Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders have affected yourself and those you love.

Send President Obama a letter to at:
President Obama
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC 20500

Must be mailed by August 17th!
OR
Send President Obama an email by filling out the form at:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact

Talking Points

The Facts:

  • Fetal alcohol exposure is an international and national crisis
  • Prenatal exposure to alcohol causes permanent brain damage
  • Prenatal exposure to alcohol is the leading cause of mental retardation
  • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders are 100% and easily preventable – simply no alcohol consumption during pregnancy
  • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders are a life long disability – from cradle to grave
  • More babies are born with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders than Autism Spectrum Disorders or Downs Syndrome
  • There is no safe amount of alcohol to drink during pregnancy
  • It is estimated that more than half of the prison population is affected by FASD
  • Prenatal exposure to alcohol costs the United States millions of dollars a year to provide services to individuals affected by a FASD
  • Early identification and intervention has huge impacts on the reduction of mental health concerns and behaviors resulting in legal intervention
  • Even with early identification and intervention, individuals with a FASD will need to lifelong supports

The Daily Realities of Living with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
As a Parent:

  • Struggles with you have raising your child with FASD
  • Struggles you have explaining the invisible brain damage to others who deal with your child* Struggle finding appropriate services for your child
  • The lesson you have learned in your journey of raising a child affected by FASD
  • Your dreams for your child

As an Adult affected by FASD

  • Struggles you had to overcome in your lifetime
  • Strengths and talents you have
  • Accommodations that enable you to be successful

As a Profession working with individuals affected byFASD

  • What systematically is working for your clients
  • What systematically is not working for your clients
  • Struggles your clients face on a daily basis
  • Struggles you face on a daily basis in obtaining resources for your clients
  • What resources are necessary for your clients to be successful

What needs to happen

  • Proclamation by the President of the United States recognizing September 9th as International Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Awareness Day and the importance of abstaining from alcohol during pregnancy
  • Ask him to ring a bell at 9:09 am on September 9 in recognition of the individuals affected by FASD.
  • Diagnostic teams in all 50 states to facilitate and identify early diagnosis and intervention
  • More resources toward prevention and early intervention

#52 Days To FASDay – Get the Current Research

GET YOUR FREE FASD
APP FROM CDC –
IT’S GREAT TO HAVE 
ALL THE DETAILS
AT YOUR FINGER TIPS

Stay on top of current statistics and research! 

Provide media interviews and reporters with the newest data.

Thank you for being a part of our Million Mind March to Build Better Baby Brains. The following letter was received by Better Endings New Beginnings – July 19, 2012 – We are offering you an early view today of the report. We appreciate everyone’s efforts. 

Dear Partners,
We would like to share with you findings that were published today in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). The report*, Alcohol use and binge drinking among women of childbearing age – United States, 2006-2010, describes findings from CDC’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) examining any alcohol use and binge drinking among pregnant and nonpregnant women of childbearing age (18-44 years) in the U.S. from 2006 to 2010. The main findings from these data analyses are:
·         7.6% of pregnant women (or 1 in 13) and 51.5% of nonpregnant women (or 1 in 2) reported drinking alcohol in the past 30 days.
·         Among pregnant women, the highest estimates of reported alcohol use were among those who were:
o   Aged 35-44 years (14.3%);
o   White (8.3%);
o   College graduates (10.0%);
o   Employed (9.6%)
·         1.4% of pregnant women (or 1 in 71) and 15.0% of nonpregnant women (or 1 in 7) reported binge drinking in the past 30 days. (Binge drinking was defined as having consumed four or more drinks on an occasion at least one time in the past 30 days.)
·         Among binge drinkers, the average frequency and intensity of binge episodes were similar, about three times per month and approximately six drinks on an occasion, among those who were pregnant and those who were not.
·         Among nonpregnant binge drinkers, binge drinking prevalence, frequency, and intensity were highest among those aged 18-24 years.
Alcohol consumption (any use and binge drinking) among pregnant women is still an important public health concern. Pregnant and nonpregnant women of childbearing age who misuse alcohol are an important population for public health interventions. This report helps identify the population of women who engage in risky drinking behaviors and can help target interventions to prevent alcohol-exposed pregnancies.
Because no safe level of alcohol during pregnancy has been established and alcohol is known to cause birth defects, developmental disabilities, and other adverse pregnancy outcomes, women who are pregnant or who might become pregnant should refrain from drinking alcohol. We know that FASDs are 100% preventable if alcohol is not consumed during pregnancy, so why take the risk?
*Reported by: Claire M. Marchetta, MPH, Clark H. Denny, PhD, R. Louise Floyd, DSN, Nancy E. Cheal, PhD, Joseph E. Sniezek, MD. Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities; Lela R. McKnight-Eily, PhD, Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Prevention Team
National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
www.cdc.gov/fasd



Online Manual – www.fasday.com
Seminar – Or try our easy, effective, exciting 1½ hour program that walks you
 through the morning of Sept.9: http://www.come-over.to/FASDAY/ABCDEFG/ 
(material from 2002 has excellent ideas)


Follow us through the next 60 days and plan your local or personal project to build awareness of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder – Each One Can Reach One!

Need family support visit www.toolboxparent.com
Need ideas for adults living with challenges of FASD visit www.braidedcord.net
Need information on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders visit www.betterendings.org
Interested in service dog for FASD visit www.thechancerchronicles.com


#54 Days To FASDay – Create visibility FREE QUILT


Create Visibility in Your Community


Make A Quilt Display of Public Awareness

All the pieces can be printed on your color printer. In addition there is a 11th Anniversary Special Library Bundle Offer from Better Endings New Beginnings

Show a video or give a presentation.

  • This can be scheduled at your local library. If you don’t feel comfortable giving a talk, your local March of Dimes office (look them up in the phone book) might be willing to provide a speaker and/or a video.
  • You can purchase an excellent video for teens and young adults called “And Down Will Come Baby” for $12.50 by calling the National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI) toll-free (800) 729-6686 (Inventory Number VHS86). There are a limited number of copies of a good prevention video with Native American theme, “Sacred Trust” available from the same source (Inventory Number VHS100).

Become a Poster Poster!

  • Print out some FASD Awareness posters and hang them up on local bulletin boards (at the store, laundromat, churches, universities, etc.) You might even get your local schools to post them.
  • Here’s everybody’s favorite poster: “Little One” – with the link for the printable version at the bottom.
  • Here’s the FASD Awareness Day poster 2005 version.
  • High quality color posters are available from NOFAS. If you print out some of these on photo paper at “best” resolution on your color printer, they will have a high quality appearance. You can have large posters printed from the small ones for just a few dollars at you local print shop.

Online Manual – www.fasday.com
Seminar – Or try our easy, effective, exciting 1½ hour program that walks you
 through the morning of Sept.9: http://www.come-over.to/FASDAY/ABCDEFG/ 
(material from 2002 has excellent ideas)


Follow us through the next 60 days and plan your local or personal project to build awareness of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder – Each One Can Reach One!

Need family support visit www.toolboxparent.com
Need ideas for adults living with challenges of FASD visit www.braidedcord.net
Need information on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders visit www.betterendings.org
Interested in service dog for FASD visit www.thechancerchronicles.com


#55 Days To FASDay – Let adults living with Fetal Alcohol speak out


Create an adults with FASD panel to share information at your local conferences and events. They have ALOT to teach us!

Listen to the Minnesota Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Adult panel speak about what it is like to live with FASD. Find adults in your community that are willing to speak our and develop your own adult parent. Those who live daily with the challenges need to be heard – create a voice for your voiceless.

Read a book and learn the realities of being an adult with FASDs.

“This is a book that commands attention and one that influences us to support speaking up in defense of the un-born. Braided Cord, Tough Times In and Out is a must read for professionals in the medical, social service and re-hab fields.” 

 Sara Hassler, Midwest Book Review

Midwest Book Review by SARA HASSLER REVIEW 6-25-2010

Braided Cord, Tough Times In and Out
Liz Kulp, Author
Better Endings New Beginnings
978-0984200719, $24.95, www.betterendings.org
Liz’s website www.braidedcord.net to order direct from author! 
Award winning author Liz Kulp brings another outstanding literary work of art to the market in her book Braided Cord, Tough Times In and Out.
Liz Kulp is a 23 year old woman who was born with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) as a result of her birth mother drinking while pregnant. As a child, Liz was in the foster care system and soon adopted at a very young age by Karl and Jodee Kulp and their family. Throughout her young life Author, Liz Kulp, kept journals and her new book, Braided Cord, is the published in-depth account of her life living with FASD. Her openness to share her feelings, her world and what the inside of her body and brain feels like is beyond brave. She is a modern day super hero who overcomes daily struggles to live in a society that does not see or fully understand her disability.
Liz Kulp takes her readers on an incredible journey deep inside the world of a sensitive growing teen and eventual mature woman who shares herself openly and completely. Fast paced, emotional and full of life lessons, readers can look forward to learning what it’s like to live with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder from Ms. Kulp’s amazing life experiences.
In order to help society change for the better, Author, Liz Kulp has stripped herself naked for all the world to see. She has stood alone, with her family, and before all of us, to teach us how important it is to not drink while pregnant. We applaud Liz. Kulp for her choices to persevere and reach out in order to save millions of innocent soon-to-be-born babies.
Author, Liz Kulp, pieces together diary entries in her book, Braided Cord, Tough Times In and Out. Dated logs from herself, her parents, life coaches, supportive partners and organizations make up her easy to read chapters. Reading Braided Cord is like stepping into Liz Kulp’s shoes. To be a witness to a disability that you cannot see or touch and to understand another human being’s world is a gift that Ms. Kulp delivers on. Kulp’s audience has the chance to sit in a pampered setting as they spiritually travel her life path. Step by step, her readers are exposed to the disturbing effects that alcohol has on the human brain, the trauma it causes families, the pain it inflicts on innocent children and the burden it places on our society. Through Liz’s life, we have a chance to learn, to grow and to be a part of saving lives. Her voice and written words are clear, exact and honest. Liz Kulp has made it possible for other children and families dealing with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders to open up, share their stories so they too can transition into the world as healthy and productive individuals.
Ms. Kulp includes an appendix with resource information for her readers to learn more. There is an enormous amount of instruction included on what Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder is and how communities can help, schools can teach, people can understand and medical staff can identify it. Parents, Karl and Jodee Kulp, along with the support of their family, speak about the horrifying effects that FASDs has had on their lives, work and what their future holds. Every gut-wrenching stone has been turned and thrown against the wall in order to reach readers in a way that provokes positive change.
This is a book that commands attention and one that influences us to support speaking up in defense of the un-born. Braided Cord, Tough Times In and Out is a must read for professionals in the medical, social service and re-hab fields. Libraries who want to expand their reading programs and booksellers who are involved in book clubs will greatly profit from sharing this educational and inspirational book with their patrons and communities.
Sara Hassler
Midwest Book Review

For those who have read Braided Cord Tough Times In and Out we are pleased to update you on a successful interdependence – Liz has come so far and offers insight and hope to others who struggle on this challenging journey.  – The Kulp Family

Best I Can Be – Living with Fetal Alcohol – by Liz Kulp, age 13, how I feel in my brain
Our FAScinating Journey – by Jodee Kulp and Liz Kulp, homeschool and brain based learning
Best I Can Be – Tough Times In and Out – by Liz Kulp, age 23, adult transitioning

Read more articles from Adults living with FASD


Online Manual – www.fasday.com
Seminar – Or try our easy, effective, exciting 1½ hour program that walks you
 through the morning of Sept.9: http://www.come-over.to/FASDAY/ABCDEFG/ 
(material from 2002 has excellent ideas)


Follow us through the next 60 days and plan your local or personal project to build awareness of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder – Each One Can Reach One!

Need family support visit www.toolboxparent.com
Need ideas for adults living with challenges of FASD visit www.braidedcord.net
Need information on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders visit www.betterendings.org
Interested in service dog for FASD visit www.thechancerchronicles.com