#15 Days To FASDay – Take a Stand for Persons Living with FASD

09.09 Reason to Take a Stand to
Build Better Baby Brains

On the ninth minute of the ninth hour of the ninth day of the ninth month, we ask the world to remember that during the nine months of pregnancy, alcohol can be very dangerous to the baby. We also ask the world to remember the millions of people worldwide who will struggle lifelong with intellectual disabilities caused by prenatal alcohol.

What the members of FASworld want:

We want to make the world aware that no amount of alcohol in pregnancy is safe for the baby.
We want to make the world aware of the millions of people internationally who can never live normally, because their brains – and often their bodies – have been damaged by alcohol before they were born.

We want our governments to invest in information programs; rehabilitation facilities for women with alcohol addiction problems, and their families; adequate diagnostic facilities, special education, and other support for individuals with FAS, and their families.

Volunteers from around the world work together year-round to build awareness. Each year, on September 9, we observe International FAS Awareness Day (FASDay) with its “Minute of Reflection” at 9:09 a.m.

Each year our memberships grows and we are represented by volunteers in Canada, the U.S., England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Ireland, Germany, France, Poland, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Uruguay, Bermuda and Costa Rica participated and new communities join in every year — be sure to let us know when your community holds a FASDay event.

#18 Days To FASDay – Two minute talk

Get a local or national interview – give it a try!
Give a Two Minute Talk
Here’s Teresa Kellerman’s for 09.09.09

Teresa’s Two Minute Talk
(I was asked to share my personal story of raising a child with FAS, and I was limited to just two minutes!)

Hello, I am John’s Mom.

That’s how I am known across the US and around the world. You see, John is famous. Not because he has Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, but because he allows his story to be told around the world, in order to raise awareness about Fetal Alcohol Disorders.

Thirty years ago, a baby was born to an alcoholic mother who did not have the gift of recovery. The baby suffered with birth defects and brain damage. The mother died.The baby came to me as a special needs foster child, one of many I cared for over the years. This baby soon became my own through adoption.

As an infant, John cried all the time, and could not be consoled. He didn’t want to be touched or cuddled, as if he rejected all love. But by the time he was two, he was a happy little guy – hyper, but happy.

Over the years, he has struggled with developmental delays and learning disorders. He had a heart defect that required open-heart surgery. This was traumatic for him and for me. But it was nothing compared to the day-to-day struggle he has with not being able to control his behavior.

John inherited alcoholism from his birth parents. To help him survive addiction, we maintain a drug free home, with no access to alcohol or other dangerous drugs.

John also needs help to survive his Fetal Alcohol disorder. His brain damage causes him to forget rules, to be impulsive, and to have poor judgment. So John requires close supervision at all times. This is has not been easy for me, and it is certainly not easy for John. But with understanding and acceptance, he trusts me to help him stay safe and healthy and happy

I am proud of John, and I am blessed to be his mother. And we are both blessed to be surrounded by loving friends here in Tucson and around the world through the Internet.

We are grateful for the support of the Division of Developmental Disabilities and are happy to share that support with other families through the Fetal Alcohol Resource Center.

#22 Days To FASDay – What One Person Can Do?

What can Only One person do?

From Deb Fjeld – a mom of four children with multiple complex issues and webweaver of www.toolboxparent.com

I was feeling frustrated the other day when I was listening to myself complain about the recent funding cuts going through our state. I realized that I have become so obsessed with trying to find grant moneys for programs that I have lost my focus like I had lost my paying job.

I had the “I’m Only One Person” Syndrome.
I felt that if I don’t find grant money for programs, that nothing good can happen and I can’t make a difference.

Then, I re-framed my thoughts. (My favorite thing to do next rationalization)

What can one person do to help a family who is struggling?

One person can (without a lot of money or no money which we sometime have):

  • be a mentor for a child
  • offer support to another parent who is struggling
  • create a blog to support other parents
  • phone a friend who has tough kids and say I appreciate what you do
  • operate a web site to help others
  • bring a meal to a sick friend
  • offer respite for a family who needs a break (even an hour makes a difference!)
  • pray for another who needs help
  • join a list serve and share ideas
  • call a church, school, government center to ring some bells on 09.09
  • get a little assembly together on your county courthouse on 09.09 to talk about FASD
  • hold a pregnant pause event at a local restaurant, hotel or bar
  • send an encouraging email to one, or all on your email list
  • write a book!
  • invite a few girlfriends out for coffee and relax!
  • read our articles on http://www.toolboxparent.com/
  • join a disccussion, ask a question, post a great idea to help professionals and parents of complex kids and intense adults at http://toolboxparent.ning.com/
  • write a review for an author who raises tough kids – your input really counts
  • HAVE FUN FUN FUN – pay attention to the little miracles every day
  • start a 501c3 (then you add a few board members and maybe get a grant)

These are things that don’t need a grant.
These are things that make an actual difference in another’s life, without costing any money.

I have noticed, though, that I receive much more in return than the effort I gave out.

What else can one person do to help another?? Any ideas we would love your comments.

Deb Fjeld and Jodee Kulp

Look what three parents with a single idea pulled off ten years ag0 and it is still continuing to ring our warnings.

FASDay 1999 began in Auckland, New Zealand, where “Minute of Reflection” bells rang at 9:09 a.m., at Mt. Albert Methodist church. Then it moved to Adelaide, Australia, and then to South Africa, where at 9:09 a.m., Cape Town volunteers gathered to hear the War Memorial Carillon that rang when Nelson Mandela was released from prison. Volunteers in Italy, Germany and Sweden held events — and then FAS Day crossed the Atlantic. Volunteers staged events and bells and carillons rang across Canada and the U.S. The westernmost activity was the community breakfast on the tiny island of Kitkatla, B.C., near the Queen Charlotte Islands, where the village bell rang at 9:09 a.m. followed by prayers in the native tongue by village elders. We missed a few international time zones.

We did it all on $100 in donations, plus thousands of hours of volunteer labor.

It was a labor of love and passionate commitment. We generated as much media attention as a million-dollar public relations campaign, and we made many new friends and supporters in the process. Many women of childbearing age learned for the first time that no amount of alcohol in pregnancy is safe.

All of us knew that in one magic minute, we really did begin to change the world.

Yeah, but…
What can one person do to fight FASD?”

You’d be surprised — if he or she is working with a world community of people equally committed to eliminating this tragic and totally preventable disorder!

#24 Days To FASDay – Listen to persons with FASD

Listen to persons who have fetal alcohol – they have insight we can all use.

This is John Kellerman’s speech given on 09.09.09
Great job John!

My name is John Kellerman.I’m the drummer in the band at the 9:30 service at St. Paul’s church. I love playing the drums. That is one thing that is easy for me.

But many things are difficult for me, because I have Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.I have a hard time making friends. I don’t always remember social rules and I can be inappropriate sometimes, especially when my mom is not around.

The hard thing about having FAS is that sometimes I act like a little kid, sometimes I act like a teenager, and sometimes I act like an adult. The really hard part is that I can never control or predict what level I will be at any time.

That’s kind of scary for me, because I know what the rules are, I know I can get into trouble, but I break the rules anyway, like I’m on a train with no engineer and the brakes don’t work.

I depend on other people to help me stay on the right track. My mom helps me by making sure I am safe all the time, and by teaching me what is important.

She teaches me to be respectful, to ask for help, and to communicate my needs.She teaches me about the dangers of alcohol. She says we can celebrate without drinking, and we can have fun without alcohol. And that nobody ever died from not drinking!

Happy FASD Awareness Day, everyone!


(Watch Johnny’s speech on YouTube: www.youtube.com/trilevelman )

‎BETTER ENDINGS NEW BEGINNINGS GIFT TO COMMUNITY

$3.00 Off “EACH BOOK!” Coupon  

Direct links provided for discount – Just add coupon code 3579462 to order – you can simply click special link for each book provided below. Any reviews or comments on our books are appreciated. Happy September 9 – for larger quantity please email jodeekulp@gmail.com and I can get you a deal.

NEW! 3rd Revision Our FAScinating Journey -Keys to Brain Potential Along the Path of Prenatal Brain Injury – (2012)https://www.createspace.com/3579462

The Whitest Wall (2012) – A Mystery novel
https://www.createspace.com/3497641

Braided Cord (2010) – Liz’s adult transition with FASD
https://www.createspace.com/3436934


Online Manual – www.fasday.com
Seminar – Or try our easy, effective, exciting 1½ hour program that walks you
 through the morning of Sept.9: http://www.come-over.to/FASDAY/ABCDEFG/ 
(material from 2002 has excellent ideas)


Follow us through the next 60 days and plan your local or personal project to build awareness of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder – Each One Can Reach One!

Need family support visit www.toolboxparent.com
Need ideas for adults living with challenges of FASD visit www.braidedcord.net
Need information on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders visit www.betterendings.org
Interested in service dog for FASD visit www.thechancerchronicles.com



#25 Days To FASDay – Information table

FASD (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder)
Information Table

You may want to have an information table, which can include the FAS Knot, a cash box for donations, and relevant local material.

  • Correctional Service Canada has produced a well-written research report, “Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Implications for Correctional Service” which is applicable to most English-speaking countries, and is also available in French. It’s available, free, in bulk, from the Research Branch, Correctional Service of Canada, 340 Laurier Ave. West, Ottawa, ON K1A 0P9, or phone Tina Bada at (613) 996-5222, fax (613)996-2867, reslib@magi.com
    It is full of facts and figures about FAS/FAE, relating to the lifespan of the affected individual, and includes recommendations for changes in the criminal justice system, taking into account the needs and disabilities of offenders with fetal alcohol disorders. This report would be particularly useful for members of the media who would like more information on the secondary disabilities of people with FAS, which make them susceptible to getting in trouble with the law.
  • Your committee might consider making various petitions available, and Bonnie Buxton ogrady@axxent.ca can suggest a number which might be appropriate.
  • We particularly like a “declaration” for men to fill out, promising to support their wives, partners, sisters, daughters, and friends in sobriety when pregnant. This declaration was developed by the Lakeland FAS Committee, in northern Alberta, Canada. The complete petition form can be downloaded at www.come-over.to/FASDAY/FathersDec.htm

Encourange Partner Declarations
The partner declaration, in the form of a petition, reads:

“I am aware that alcohol exposure during pregnancy may cause irreversible brain damage to the baby, therefore, I declare that I will support and encourage my partner, friends and family members to be alcohol free during pregnancy.”

FAS fact sheet and educational handouts
There is a file called FASdisk that can be downloaded in its entirety or just selected documents. The FASdisk can be found at http://come-over.to/FASdisk/

Suggested documents include:

#27 Days To FASDay – Host a baby shower

Plan a PARTY!

A PREGNANT PAUSE EVENT or HOST A BABY SHOWER FOR A NEW SOON-TO-BE MOM

Get a group of friends and join together to
support sobriety for a newly pregnant mom.

Need some ideas….

Visit Liz Kulp’s
FunWithoutAlcohol blog for FREE RECIPES

Download some great SPIRIT FREE RECIPES

Host a Non-Alcoholic Drink Mixing Contest with the best drink toasted to the future.

Take a PASS commitment to support a sober pregnancy – offering to find spirit free fun events and support during the tough and joyous moments.

Most of all HAVE FUN and CELEBRATE

Join the
Million Minds March to Build Better Baby Brains
Raise the Standard
Zero 4 Nine

Amazon.com Widgets

#26 Days To FASDay – Free FASD videos


Special thank you to our New York team of Advocates who prepared this video and to all the children, teens and adults with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) who offered their pictures to put a FACE on FAS.

Help us “Raise The Standard” for our next generation!

Person First Language from MOFAS – 
this will help you promote awareness honorably to all

Not only must we walk the walk – we must talk the talk.
Yes, person first language takes more space to write and more time to say, but the end result allows for respect in honoring the strengths and abilities of another person.

Watch the MOFAS tutorial and give it a go for all your FASD presentations.



Use Teresa Kellerman’s video

in your presentations on Fetal Alcohol to build awareness.
This is worth watching – very short

Want the facts about alcohol use during pregnancy?
Here they are.
All sources are cited at end of video.
More information available here: www.come-over.to/FASCRC

More videos you can use from YouTube
(search FASD or fetal alcohol on You Tube to review – NOFAS has an excellent new series)




Recovering Hope is an intimate and evocative video about the mothers and families of children who are affected by Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). The video, created for viewing by women in recovery and their counselors, is divided into to half-hour episodes to allow time for discussion within a treatment session.

Eight women tell poignant, memorable stories. They speak out about how alcohol use during pregnancy affected their children, how they are learning effective new ways to parent, and how they are recovering hope for the future. Six researchers and clinicians support these stories by explaining the physical, mental, behavioral and learning disabilities associated with FASD and discussing evaluation and intervention services

Need a speaker? Check out the http://www.nofas.org/ Resource Directory for US speakers

Online Manual – www.fasday.com
Seminar – Or try our easy, effective, exciting 1½ hour program that walks you
 through the morning of Sept.9: http://www.come-over.to/FASDAY/ABCDEFG/ 
(material from 2002 has excellent ideas)


Follow us through the next 60 days and plan your local or personal project to build awareness of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder – Each One Can Reach One!

Need family support visit www.toolboxparent.com
Need ideas for adults living with challenges of FASD visit www.braidedcord.net
Need information on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders visit www.betterendings.org
Interested in service dog for FASD visit www.thechancerchronicles.com


#28 Days To FASDay – An easy FASDay Plan

AN EASY FASDay Plan
Yes! You and one friend can do something!

Easy Plan – The Foolproof FAS Day Formula
Sit down with paper and pen. If you have one or two other key people to work with, print up copies of this manual, and invite them to join you. Give them some time to read it, and then answer the following questions:

  • Who is chairing this event?
  • Who can we count on to help out?
  • What kind of help can they give us?
  • Who do we know will want to attend?
  • Potential attendees — what other people and organizations in the community do we want to reach? (Start with interested friends and family members, and professionals –doctors, lawyers, teachers, etc. – that you know. Then add people who should be interested: e.g., local municipal, state/provincial and federal politicians, agencies with an interest in FAS, school personnel, etc.)
  • How many people can we reasonably expect to attend?
  • Will we require child care?
  • Where should we hold this event?
  • Who are our best local media contacts to promote this event and the FAS issue?

1. Confirm location.
Once you’ve decided how many people are likely to attend, choose your location. Try to find a reasonably-sized meeting room with comfortable seating, and a convenient area to serve coffee, tea, juice, and snacks.
2. How to Obtain a FAS Day Proclamation
If you want civic and state FAS Day proclamations, find out the appropriate name to write to, and do this immediately. You’ll find a boiler-plate letter plus sample proclamations in this document. (Note: Canada’s provincial governments are not likely to issue proclamations.)
3. Planning the Video Premiere — Plus
The program is a simple one, but you’re going to need to make some choices.
Who will be M.C.? Choose the most articulate person in your group, or try for a local personality who could be sympathetic to your cause – e.g., a TV or radio broadcaster or local entertainment figure.

  • Will you use the Invocation, and if so, who will read it?
  • Will you ask your mayor or a municipal counsellor to read the Proclamation?
  • How will you observe the worldwide “Minute of Reflection” at 9:09 a.m.? e.g., will someone ring a bell nine times?
  • Or will you say a prayer, sing a song, have someone play a musical instrument, or have simple silence?
  • Will you have a keynote speaker following the video, and if so, who?
  • Or will you have a panel discussion? Your panel could include a birth parent, a foster or adoptive parent, an articulate survivor of FAS/FAE and a professional (teacher, doctor or nurse, psychologist or social worker, knowledgeable lawyer or judge, etc.)
  • Will you add music to the mix – possibly a live musician?
  • Would you like to close with the poem, “The Integrity of Hope,” by Michael Kami? And if so, who will read it?

4. Invitations and flyersWe’ve enclosed a sample invitation and 2 sample flyer/posters. Ask your committee members to come up with names of people to invite, and make a master list, which can be used in 2001. To save on postage, you may want to e-mail and fax many of your invitations, but make sure to follow up with a personal phone call. The invitation contains a RSVP: whose number will invitees call?
5. Breakfast Food and Drink
Easy does it. Muffins and/or bagels, cheese or cream cheese optional, possibly some cut-up melon or citrus fruit, coffee, tea and fruit juice, cream/milk and sugar. Possibly a local retailer or coffee shop may be willing to make a donation. If you’re tight for cash, possibly a local service club or church will help. Will you need storage or refrigeration or help setting up tables? Do you have enough electric coffeemakers?
6. Other equipment
Make sure your video equipment is adequate well in advance of Sept. 9.

  • Is your VCR working?
  • Is your TV set or monitor large enough for the size of group you expect?
  • If you’re expecting two dozen people or more, you may need two or more monitors hooked up to one VCR: this can be done easily with a splitter. Most audio-visual specialty stores can show you how it’s done.
  • If more people than you expect turn up, simply hold two screening sessions. One group snacks and chats while the other group watches the video. Then they trade places.
    Your alternative is to rent a video projector and screen from a company specializing in video display or presentation rentals. This will cost about $250-$300 per day, and you will need to darken the room. Some colleges and universities have this equipment in screening rooms.

7. Media RelationsYou’ll find a sample media release, ready for you to personalize with local information. Make a list of all of the members of the media you would like to reach, particularly those whom you know personally. You should also prepare a list of individuals who are knowledgeable about FAS, and willing to talk to the media. These might include participants on your panel – parents, people with FAS, and professionals. The media release can be faxed, but make sure you have a person who will make follow-up phone calls. You will also need a media contact for any members of the press, radio or TV who want to know more.
8. OtherBells and carillons around the world will be ringing nine times at 9:09 a.m. in the international Bell Concordance, to remind the world that during the nine months of pregnancy, a woman should not consume alcohol. If there is a church bell in your community, you may want to speak to the minister or priest, to ask if it is rung manually. If so, we suggest you photocopy the material from the FASworld Report regarding the Bell Concordance, or download and print it from the website http://www.come-over.to/FASDAY/manual.htm , and invite the church to join in. If you live in a city which is lucky enough to have a carillon, get the name of the carillonneur and do the same. Gerald Martindale, carillonneur at Toronto’s Metropolitan United Church geraldm@planeteer.com> is building on last year’s concert of international lullabies and would be pleased to share this with other international carillonneurs.

  • Make sure you have a guest book easily accessible as guests enter or leave. It would be useful to have someone stationed to remind people to sign the guest book and hand out FAS Knots as your guests arrive.
  • The FAS awareness symbol, the FAS Knot can be easily made for about 8 cents each. They can be given away, sold for about $2-3 each, or you can simply have a cash box available for donations. Complete information on the FAS Knot can be found at www.come-over.to/FASDAY/manual.htm
    FAS Knots and the guest book can be placed on an information table, with other available material. The table can also include petitions your group wishes to support.

For suggestions for both U.S. and Canadian petitions, e-mail Bonnie Buxton at ogrady@axxent.ca.
For suggestions on posters and printed material you can download yourself, check out the website
http://come-over.to/FASdisk/

#29 Days To FASDay – How to make a FAS Knot

TIE SOME FASKnotsand Pass Them Around Town or School

The FAS Knot – A Symbol for Our Time
We have been pleased by the enthusiasm that volunteers from New Zealand to Arctic Alaska and Canada’s northern territories of Yukon and Nunavut to South Africa have expressed for our unique, wearable symbol, the “FAS Knot.” Each FAS Knot can be easily made in about a minute, for less than ten cents, and can be used as a fund-raiser ($2-$5 each) or given away as reminders of the work we all do to help prevent FASD.
This piece of knotted cord was designed in memory of Abel Dorris, 1968-1991, whose brief and poignant life resulted in the groundbreaking 1989 book about Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, “The Broken Cord,” written by his father, Michael Dorris, 1945-1997.
The broken cord may refer to the umbilical cord, the spinal cord, the nervous system, the cord between the generations, or the cable on an elevator. Michael Dorris wrote that if we back off on our children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effects (i.e. Alcohol-Related Neurodevelopmental Disorder), they will sink and crash like an elevator once the cable is snapped.
Years later, a loving community around the world reconnected the broken cord, and the FAS Knot is our symbol. The cord is tied in a square knot, sometimes called a reef knot, the favored knot for reconnecting a broken line or cord. The knot is stronger than the cord itself, and cannot be broken or snapped.
To make the FAS Knot, we suggest an eight-inch piece of 3/16″ white cord, available in most hardware stores for a few cents per foot. You make a circle approximately the size of your thumb, then tie right over left and under; left over right and under. It should look like two loops intertwined. (Volunteers in Germany and New Zealand use a thinner cord, and make a more discreet knot. The choice is up to you.)
By choosing a cord instead of a ribbon, we are separating ourselves from all of the other campaigns. We are not just another cause trying to raise money – we represent those millions of individuals and their families who have gone unrecognized, unidentified, neglected on this continent and throughout the world.
The circle symbolizes the womb, a baby’s head, the human brain, the earth. And we, a planet-size network of people who care about people living with FASD, are the knot that will make them whole. If women did not drink in pregnancy, FASD would be totally eliminated.
Our long-range goal is to rename this small piece of cord, “The FAS Not!”
The FAS Knot lapel pin is a more recent innovation and can also be used for fund raising. Many groups resell the pin for $5 or $6.
The pin is available for the low cost of C$3/pin for orders of 25 or more. Shipping is free for orders of 100 or more. The pin is white enamel with a faux gold edge and is approximately 1.8 cm wide. The FAS Knot lapel pin is a registered trademark of FASworld Canada. The lapel pin may not be replicated, copied or incorporated into any other design without specific written permission from FASworld Canada.
The original FAS Knot was designed by Bonnie Buxton and Brian Philcox, and is an official symbol of FASworld. You can find step-by-step photos above. We encourage groups supporting FASD endeavours to use it for promotion or fund-raising, and ask only that you notify us before doing so.

E-mail us at info@fasworld.comHow to Make a FAS Knot

THE FAS KNOT STORY

“A threefold cord is not quickly broken.”
–The Bible, Ecclesiastes IV, 10

In 1999, volunteers from New Zealand and South Africa to Nunavut used the FAS Knot as a symbol of our worldwide campaign to inform the world about Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and related disorders.
This piece of knotted cord was designed in memory of Abel Dorris, 1968-1991, whose brief and poignant life resulted in the groundbreaking 1989 book about Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, The Broken Cord, written by his father, Michael Dorris, 1945-1997.
The broken cord may refer to the umbilical cord, the spinal cord, the nervous system, the cord between the generations, or the cable on an elevator. Michael Dorris wrote that if we back off on our children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effects, they will sink like an elevator once the cable is snapped. Ten years after Dorris’s book, a loving community around the world reconnected the broken cord, developing the FAS Knot as our symbol.
Each knot can be made easily and cheaply in less than a minute. The cord is tied in a square knot, sometimes called a reef knot, the favoured knot for reconnecting a broken line or cord. The knot is stronger than the cord itself, and cannot be broken or snapped. You may want to sell the knots for $2-$5, or ask for donations.
Volunteers in the U.S. and Canada generally use an eight-inch piece of 3/16″ white cord, available in most hardware stores for a few cents per foot. Volunteers in New Zealand and Germany have made smaller, more discreet FAS Knots, using thinner cord. Make a circle approximately the size of your thumb (possibly smaller if you use a thinner cord), then tie right over left and under; left over right and under. Using a straight pin or safety pin, pin this to your lapel or other garment with the loop above and the knot below.
Step-by-step photos of the FAS Knot may be seen on the website at www.come-over.to/FASDAY/manual.htm
We have chosen a cord instead of a ribbon, to separate ourselves from all of the other campaigns. We are not just another cause trying to raise money — we represent those millions of individuals and their families who have gone unrecognized, unidentified, neglected on this continent and throughout the world.
The circle symbolizes the womb, a baby’s head, the human brain, the earth. And we, a planet-size network of people who care about people living with FAS, are the knot that will make them whole. FAS is totally preventable. We must create a society in which everyone recognizes that there is no lower threshold for drinking in pregnancy. Our long-range goal is to rename this small piece of cord, “The FAS Not!”
The FAS Knot was designed by Bonnie Buxton and Brian Philcox, trademark pending.

Copy for FAS Knot Scroll (optional)
(You may want to print a one-page sheet, roll it up in a scroll, and tuck each one inside the loop of a FAS Knot. The sheet can contain information about the program, and also includes this information about the Knot.)

THE FAS KNOT
This piece of knotted cord was designed in memory of Abel Dorris, 1968-1991, whose brief and poignant life resulted in the groundbreaking 1989 book about Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, “The Broken Cord,” written by his father, Michael Dorris, 1945-1997.
The broken cord may refer to the umbilical cord, the spinal cord, the nervous system, the cord between the generations, or the cable on an elevator. Michael Dorris wrote that if we back off on our children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effects, they will sink like an elevator once the cable is snapped.
The circle symbolizes the womb, a baby’s head, the human brain, the earth. And we, a planet-size network of people who care about people living with FAS, are the knot that will make them whole. FAS is totally preventable. We must create a society in which everyone recognizes that there is no lower threshold for drinking in pregnancy. Our long-range goal is to rename this small piece of cord, “The FAS Not!”

#31 Days To FASDay – Write a poem


Write a poem and speak out!

I have a dream …

That one day little children will not be born with brain damage because of the alcohol they were fed before they were even borm.

I have a dream…

That one day persons with inivisible disabilities will not be treated second-class citizens, but will be able to participate in their local communities accepted in their differences

I have a dream…

That one day predators and persecutors will not addionally victimize persons with fetal alcohol. That people will realize it is no joke. That the day – to – day struggle is real and cannot be kissed away, or bandaged or ignored.

I have a dream…

That one day we will see all people as mattering.

On September 9, 1999, Liz (age 13)
and Jodee Kulp spoke out about the
realities of FASD. 

As my daughter, Liz Kulp said,

“You can’t be handicapped
if you are born like that. 
You just are.”



And this beautiful poem by 

Faceless

By Jennifer Woodward
Peering into a shattered mirror, I try to find myself,
However, all I am is faceless.
I gave up searching because I am always lost.
You lost when you took away my mirror,
My only hope of learning, and living.
Why can you not fix me?
Oh, right how could I forget you did this to me?
I am trying to get over it, over you,
But finding broken pieces of my heart lying
Around me, reminding me of being not whole.
Looking at me in my mirror only leaves me scared and confused.
I cannot see me,
I am faceless.
The world does not see me,
They see a title.
Help me find myself,
Why must I grow knowing I am faceless?
$B!! (B
The face of FASD is sometimes faceless, silent as the world goes by not knowing that we exist. I want you to look me in the eyes and not shut me out, not forget about me. I am here. Maybe you need to look in your mirror.
$B!! (B
Written by: Jennifer Woodward
(Please use and give full credit to Jennifer) FASDay

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