#47 Days To FASDay – Host a mini-event non-alcoholic drink ideas

Organize a Mind Mapping Meeting.

If you have community interest and commitment already and want to move forward, and want to do more than just a one-day media event, then you are ready to follow the Prince George’s Northern Family Health Society model for community action.

If this is too overwhelming, then stick to something simple and easy, like the last idea here:

Host a Mini FASD Awareness Campaign!
This is great for the office – yours or your doctor’s – or any reception area that will give you permission. Just a bowl of Snickers mini bars and some FASD Fact Cards are all you need. Details here.

Check out NON-ALCOHOLIC DRINK RECIPES

FEATURE SITE OF THE DAY – KENTUCKY www.kyfasd.org 

This set of words means different things to different people.

To a pregnant woman,
it means that she chooses not to drink for the health of her baby.
To a doctor,
it means sifting through information to come to a correct diagnosis.
To a teacher,
it means learning to look at behaviors in a different way.
To a parent or caregiver,
it means trying new things and reaching out for help.
To a couple planning a pregnancy,
it means thinking ahead and avoiding alcohol.
To a pregnant woman with alcoholism,
it means courage to ask for help.
To a community,
it means responding with compassion, understanding and new eyes.

  • Baby Love Activities  BRAND NEW: BABYLOVE PRESENTATION for middle / high school students! (Includes powerpoint with facilitator’s notes and two optional video links, and three optional handouts / activities.)                

  • Advocacy Guidebooks  These two advocacy guidebooks can be filled out by parents / caregivers, then given to new therapists, teachers, etc. (They are identical, except one references FASD, while the other only mentions “brain differences”.)


OTHER GREAT SITES

  • The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration funds the FASD Center for Excellence, a clearinghouse for FASD resources and materials: http://www.fasdcenter.samhsa.gov/index.cfm
  • The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is dedicated to eliminating birth defects caused by alcohol consumption during pregnancy and to improving the quality of life for affected families and individuals:    http://www.nofas.org/


Online Manual – www.fasday.com
Seminar – Or try our easy, effective, exciting 1½ hour program that walks you
 through the morning of Sept.9: http://www.come-over.to/FASDAY/ABCDEFG/ 
(material from 2002 has excellent ideas)


Follow us through the next 60 days and plan your local or personal project to build awareness of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder – Each One Can Reach One!

Need family support visit www.toolboxparent.com
Need ideas for adults living with challenges of FASD visit www.braidedcord.net
Need information on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders visit www.betterendings.org
Interested in service dog for FASD visit www.thechancerchronicles.com

#49 Days To FASDay – Great FREE downloads



Two great sites filled with GREAT FREE DOWNLOADS
Visit Nine Zero and MOFAS

High Quality • Accurate Data • Effective Materials

  • VIDEO PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS
  • NINEZERO RACK CARDS
  • NINEZERO TRIFOLD BROCHURES
  • BILLBOARD 
  • POSTERS

NineZero Project
National Leader in building awareness and prevention

REVIEW THE STUDENT ACTIVIST GUIDE – 
What a great way to get involved!

The NineZero Project is a way for you to affect the next generation. NineZero stands for Nine Months, Zero Alcohol. That’s what we want you to stand for, too. By committing to avoid alcohol during pregnancy and encouraging others to do the same, you will be helping the next generation avoid the challenges that come with a lifetime of developmental disabilities.

An initiative of The Arc of Riverside County, the NineZero Project for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) prevention began in Moreno Valley in 2001 and is now reaching numerous counties in California and many other states. NineZero is rapidly becoming the word most associated with FASD prevention everywhere. The Arc of Riverside County hopes that through their prevention efforts, they can also raise awareness of the need for services and supports for people with FASD.

The most important aspect of the NineZero Project is our peer-to-peer training education curriculum called Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Teaching and Research Awareness Campaign (FASTRAC).

FASD Impacts Us All.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) is caused when a woman drinks alcohol during pregnancy.  FASD is common.  It is costly.  And it is 100% preventable.
Since 1998, the Minnesota Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (MOFAS) has been the hub of hope for individuals and families affected by FASD.  MOFAS is the statewide organization serving as the leading voice and resource on FASD in Minnesota – standing up for the rights of the FASD community, providing education and training so FASD is better understood and working to ensure that all women know that there is no safe level of alcohol use during pregnancy.
We invite you to browse our site to learn about the Minnesota Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (MOFAS). Share in our vision of celebrating alcohol-free pregnancies.  And help us prevent FASD.

#58 Days To FASDay – Call a friend

Get the Fetal Alcohol Awareness Day Celebration started.

If you are like most other FASD Awareness Day activists, 
you don’t have much time or energy. 
But have no fear – we have done the groundwork for you.

Here is ONE THING you can do now. It’s fun and really not that hard.
Give it a try. Nothing to lose, right?

If you think you are busy, look at how busy this Mom is. Three kids, two with special needs.
If she can do it, you can do it too, can’t you?

Here are three easy steps to get started:

(1) Pick a Partner!
You don’t have to do this alone.
Grab your phone and call someone in your area.

In the US? Look here: USA Directory
Click on your state. Connect with someone.

  • Choose a person on Facebook you’d like to partner with
  • Join the FASDay Mailing List Serve on Yahoo Groups and connect with other support list serves (go to http://groups.yahoo.com and search for FASD and/or Fetal Alcohol)
  • Connect on Google Plus (search FASD Awareness)
  • Follow FASDay International at Pinterest

Here’s support in Canada.

Here’s some international contacts.

If you can’t afford a phone call outside your area, then email somebody.
You don’t have to do this alone.
There’s someone else out there who is willing to help.
Ask and you just might receive!

Let today be a blessing of more friendship connections!


Follow us through the next 60 days and plan your local or personal project to build awareness of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder – Each One Can Reach One!

Need family support visit www.toolboxparent.com
Need ideas for adults living with challenges of FASD visit www.braidedcord.net
Need information on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders visit www.betterendings.org
Interested in service dog for FASD visit www.thechancerchronicles.com

#59 Days To FASDay – You can do a bell concordance

Join us in pledging to set your cell phone bells (alarm) to ring on 9.09 at 9 am

We’ve made this year easy and you can make it last every year by simply selecting “Each Year” if you choose to do this ONE SMALL THING then please let us know at Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Awareness Causes

Or Do IT UP BIG! Hold a Bell Concordance
What is the Bell Concordance?
(From the Oxford English Dictionary) Concordance: 1. The fact of agreeing or being concordant; agreement, harmony…4. An agreeable or satisfactory blending of musical sounds or notes; harmony.)On Sept.9, 1999, bells around the world marked the “magic minute” at 9:09 a.m., and we named this ringing of bells, “The FAS Bell Concordance.”
It was so successful that other organizations have picked up this term and copied it!

We came up with the bell idea as there is a purity about bells that reminds us of the innocence of children. As well, bells are historically associated with warnings, alarms, marking important moments, and simply pealing for the joy of connecting with the community. FASDay is all of these things.

On FASDay, 2000, even more bells and other percussion instruments were played – ranging from the first mission bell in New Zealand to the historic 56 bell carillon in Cape Town, South Africa, to tiny bells rung by school children, and wind chimes and rain sticks played by native Canadians.

Last year, on September 9, we want the noisiest, most joyful Bell Concordance ever — and you can organize one, even if right now you are the only person in your community who knows what FASD is!

You might even be able to organize the ringing of a local carillon — the largest musical instrument in existence. Even in a large, noisy city, carillon music can be heard for several blocks. There are about 600 carillons throughout the world, and we would like many more to ring during the Minute of Reflection this year.

To find out if there is a carillon near you, go to http://www.gcna.org/, the most complete and accurate listings of carillons in North America, and also check out www.cs.yale.edu/~douglas-craig/bells and http://soda.csua.berkeley.edu/~maestro/stat.htm.
Gerald Martindale, carillonneur at Toronto’s Metropolitan United Church (email:geraldm@planeteer.com), can help put you in touch with a local carillonneur (carillon player), if there is one. Mr. Martindale has created a concert of international lullabies, representing some of the countries participating in FASDay, and would be pleased to share his arrangements with other international carillonneurs.

The FAS Bell Concordance is quite simple, and you can do most of the work on your phone. Is there a tower with a hand-rung bell in your community? This could be an older church, a city or county hall, state or provincial building, or part of a college or university campus. Unfortunately many church bells are now rung by computer, making it difficult to ring the bells off-schedule, and this may be the case in your community.

Find out who is in charge of getting that bell rung, and ask that person to have the bell rung for one minute at 9:09 a.m. on September 9.

You can download the FASDay information from this site and present it to this person. If this building is a church, you may wish to speak briefly to the congregation on one of the Sundays before FASDay, and explain why the bell will be ringing at 9:09 this year.

You may want to have a small program in the church or near the bell tower, for 20 minutes to a half-hour before 9:09 a.m. Notify your child’s school, friends of FASD and related organizations that you think would be interested, e.g., your local ARC (U.S.), Association for Community Living (Canada), Exchange Club, homelessness and anti-poverty coalitions, John Howard and Elizabeth Fry Societies, and every single friend or relative you can convince to come.

Ring Bells at 9:09 am on 09.09!
Search out bells in your community
  • Church Bells
  • School Bells
  • High School Orchestra
  • Cow Bells
  • Government Bells
  • Business Door Bells
  • Bells on Retail Store PA systems
Make connections today to schedule a special bell ringing ceremony of ringing out the warnings of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

Hundreds of crazy but wonderful people in communities in every time zone volunteer their time and energy to organize FASDAY activities, where parents and professionals alike join forces in this phenomenal grassroots movement that now involves thousands of participants.
Is the world listening?
We think so!

No bells in your community?

  • Use other musical instruments of your choice: drums, cymbals, whatever.
  • One FASDay supporter shook her grandmother’s old school bell,
  • A group in a small northern Canadian community approached their local fire department!

The FAS Community Resource Center that provides the majority of the information for FASDAY activists has 50,000 people each month visit its web pages that contain a wealth of information on research, prevention, and intervention of fetal alcohol issues. Parents, professionals, teachers and students alike visit the popular web site to educate themselves and to share information with others by downloading the hundreds of articles and handouts available there.
The FAS Center web site can be found here: http://fasstar.com/fas

This should be a happy occasion.

Those ringing bells, or whatever else you choose, will be a powerful auditory reminder that we are all connected to the planet, and each other, and make a statement that FASD can be beaten.

Online Manual – www.fasday.com
Seminar – Or try our easy, effective, exciting 1½ hour program that walks you
 through the morning of Sept.9: http://www.come-over.to/FASDAY/ABCDEFG/ 
(material from 2002 has excellent ideas)


Follow us through the next 60 days and plan your local or personal project to build awareness of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder – Each One Can Reach One!

Need family support visit www.toolboxparent.com
Need ideas for adults living with challenges of FASD visit www.braidedcord.net
Need information on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders visit www.betterendings.org

Let My Yes, Be Yes and My No, Be No

After almost 30 years of parenting an array of complex children who have grown into now adults I learned that Yes, my no must mean no. It has to. A ‘no-boundary’ must be clear and visible.

Working with tough kids you could spend all day using NO and sorry to say a NO used to often blows through one ear and out the other never stopping to allow a thought.

I have learned that one must use that NO frugally because it is a precious word of great power. For atypical children/adults, especially those with brain injury it sends them to the end of a cliff in a free-fall without answers. The word NO becomes a set up for defensive behaviors.

My friend and I were comparing notes and we have both come to the same conclusion – we use YES most often, whenever we can. So NO sticks when it is needed, and we can be strong enough the stand still without bending.

  • How can we do that with tough kids who look like they are defying or challenging us?
  • How do we keep control while giving them a path of acceptance?
  • How do we use YES, so we create boundaries and don’t become a doormat?

When I am asked to do something

  • I do not have time to do,
  • I don’t want to do,
  • I don’t know how to do.

I use the following statements:

If it is something I also want to do and it is a good idea, I make an appointment

  • Yes, we can go to the park tomorrow after you eat your lunch or after your nap. Then I remind them in the morning – Remember after your nap we get to go to the park.Yes, we can deliver those job applications, after you bring them back to me filled out. If you need help filling them out I am available right after dinner.

I provide abilities to accomplish the idea

If it is something I can’t do I say so.

  • I can’t do that because it is (describe behavior – cheating, lying) and I like to look at my face in the morning and say smiling “Good morning, Jodee, this will be another grand and glorious day.)

My moral standards need to stand firm.

If it is something I don’t know how to do I say so.

  • I don’t know how to do that, can you find out how to do that for me or maybe we can find out how to do that.

Together we can make this happen.

Share your ideas so that when a NO has to happen it can stick.

Toolbox Parent Radio is making a difference. Thanks Victoria for last night!

Deb Fjeld, Minnesota Parent Advocate and I, Jodee Kulp, recently completed our 8th broadcast of Toolbox Parent Radio on Global Talk Radio. When we were first selected to share our insights into the rough and tumble world of living with intense and atypical children/adults with a variety of diagnosis – we weren’t sure we could do it.

Could we get a large enough audience?
Would people be interested in interviews with us?

We are happy to announce our numbers of listeners are growing each week and we are almost booked for interviews through year end.

So I guess we are doing it!
And…we will keep on keeping on…and on….and on

Last night we chatted with Victoria Deasy who has been a special education teacher for 36 years and is Mom to a young adult with multiple issues. As she said last night,”Nothing prepared her for the real day to day world of parenting a person with fetal alcohol, FASD. She felt so alone.”
Alone is what we want to help. Deb Fjeld and Jodee Kulp, offer our voices and friends in the disABILITY world community to help provision families and professionals to support persons with neuro differences.

Listen to July 21 archive with Victoria Deasy at www.globaltalkradio.com/shows/toolboxparent (main show page) or www.globaltalkradio.com/shows/toolboxparent/program8.php (July 21-Victoria Deasy archive).